Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 03/12/2013
Answering a question from Senator Wyden, "...can you give me a yes or no answer to the question, does the government collect any data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans?"  Director Clapper answered, "No sir." Wyden asked, "It does not?" Clapper answered, "Not wittingly. There are cases where they could inadvertently, perhaps, collect, but not wittingly."
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 03/17/2013
Part 1: Wyden: if an intelligence agency wants to track an American inside the United States, how much evidence do they need? Clapper: First, particularly in the case of NSA and CIA, there are strictures against tracking American citizens in the United States for foreign intelligence purposes. And that’s what those agencies are set up to do.
James Clapper
 Director of National Intelligence
MSNBCW 06/11/2013
answering Andrea Mitchell's 6/9/13 question about his 03/13/13 sworn Senate testimony denying US collects information on millions of Americans, calling it "least untruthful "
Tim Huelskamp
U.S. Representative R-Kansas
FOXNEWSW 06/12/2013
Wyden: Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on a million or hundreds of millions of Americans? Clapper: No, sir. Wyden: It does not? Clapper: Not wittingly. There are cases where they could inadvertently perhaps collect, but not wittingly. Hannity: now, before I get to his clarification, was that a lie, congressman Huelskamp, in light of all we know at this moment? Huelskamp: It sure looks and sounds like a lie, Sean. What was astounding in a classified briefing say, hey, I had to tell you a lie. And the people deserve to know. We did not have to sacrifice our individual liberties for security. It's difficult job to do. But Nixon’s Attorney General and his Chief of Staff were convicted of lying to Congress and I think Clapper’s done the same thing here.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
MSNBCW 07/03/2013
Mitchell: Can you explain what you meant when you said there was not data collection on millions of Americans? Clapper: well, the -- first, as I said, I have great respect for senator Wyden. I thought in retrospect, I was asked when are you going to stop beating your wife kind of question, which is meaning not answerable necessarily by a simple yes or no. So I responded in what I thought was the most truthful or least untruthful manner by saying no.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 09/12/2013
So let me move on to the second S, Snowden. Just to make the point, not a whistleblower. And as loathe as I am to give any credit for what has happened here, which is egregious, I think it is clear that some of the conversations that this has generated, some of the debate, is actually -- it probably needed to happen. Perhaps it is unfortunate it did not happen some time ago. If there is a good side to this maybe that is it.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 09/12/2013
One of the things we are doing, obviously, is to try to open up and be more transparent and explain to people what we are doing. It is very clear that to the extent we keep the tools at all it will be legislatively amended. We can do with more oversight that would give people more confidence in what we are doing.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 09/26/2013
We will continue to declassify more documents. That is what the American people want and what thePpresident has asked us to do and I personally believe it is the only way we can reassure our citizens that their intelligence community is using its tools and authorities appropriately. The rules and oversight that govern us ensure that we do what the people want us to do, which is protect our nation security and our people's liberties.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 09/26/2013
We do not spy on anyone except for valid foreign intelligence purposes and we only work within the law. On occasion, as you stated, we have made mistakes, some quite significant. But these are usually caused by human error or technical problems. And whenever we’ve found mistakes, we reported, addressed and corrected them. The National Security Sgency specifically, as part of the U.S. intelligence community, and broadly, is an honorable institution.
Mark Udall
Senator (D-Colorado) Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 09/26/2013
Udall: In the spirit of transparency General, would you agree to declassify the whole history of the bulk collection program? Clapper: Not having read it, i would like to take it off the record. As a general premise, i think we are pushing transparency, and we will declassify as much as we can. I would rather read these documents and get some advice from general counsel about it. Udahl: My time is running out. I have many many more questions
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Before these unauthorized disclosures we were always conservative about discussing the specifics of our collection programs, based on the truism that the more adversaries know about what we are doing the more they can avoid our surveillance. But the disclosures, for better or for worse, have lowered the threshold for discussing these matters in public. So to the degree we can discuss them, we will.
Christopher Coons
U.S. Senator, D-Delaware
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Coons:I will repeat Senator Franken’s solid point that you’ve made some very significant progress in terms of transparency and commitment to response to the Congressional oversight, but temporary changes in policy and practice do not provide lasting assurance. Changes in statute will. Clapper: I completely agree with that. That if these changes whatever they are, are embedded in law, that would instantiate a degree of permanence that our doing it administratively would not.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Rogers: So part of that framework, is my understanding, is that plans and intentions of foreign leaders would be important for the united states to know. Clapper: As long as i have been in the intelligence business, 50 years, leadership intentions, in whatever form that’s expressed, is kind of a basic tenant of what we collect and analyze. Rogers: Why would that be important for policy makers to know, what the intentions of foreign leaders might or might not be?
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Clapper: For one to determine if, from an intelligence perspective, what they are saying, gels with what is going on, is invaluable to us to know where countries are coming from and what their policies are, how that would impact us across a whole range of issues. it isn't just leaders themselves. it's what goes on around them and the policies that they convey to their governments.
Mike Rogers
Representative (R-Mich.), Chair, House Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Rogers: Certainly in my time since being in the business as an FBI agent since 2004 on this committee, I have always found the best way to determine a foreign leader's intentions is to somehow, either get close to a foreign leader or actually get communications of a foreign leader. Would that be accurate? Clapper: yes it would.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Rogers: the intelligence committee might try to target foreign leaders intensions to try to determine what the best policy might be for the United States Clapper: It's one of the first things I learned in intel school in 1963. It's the fundamental given in the intelligence business, is leadership intentions no matter what level you are talking about. That could be military leaders as well.
Mike Rogers
Representative (R-Mich.), Chair, House Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Rogers: Do you believe that the allies have conducted at any time any type of espionage activity against the United States of America, our intelligence services, our leaders or otherwise? Clapper: Absolutely.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Clapper: I have to say, Chairman Rogers, some of this reminds me a lot of the classic movie Casa Blanca. My god there’s gambling going on around here, it's the same kind of thing.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Clapper: in all of this, whether we amend a tool or remove it entirely, it actually is the same impact as a cut, as a reduction in capability occasioned by sequestration. And the net effect is we will do the very best we can with the tools and capabilities we're given. But I think it's incumbent on all of us collectively to recognize the fact that when that happens we are incurring greater risk. i say that as a general comment.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Clapper: the (unauthorized) disclosures for better or for worse have lowered the threshold for discussing these matters in public so to the degree that we can discuss them we will. But this public discussion should be based on an accurate understanding of the intelligence community. Who we are, what we do and how we’re overseen. In the last few months the manner in which our activities have been characterize has often been incomplete, inaccurate or misleading or some combination there of.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Clapper: But what we do not do, is spy unlawfully on Americans or for that matter spy indiscriminately on the citizens of any country. We only spy for valid foreign intelligence purposes as authorized by law with multiple layers of oversight to ensure we don't abuse our authorities.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Clapper: (we do understand) the concerns on the part of the public. I’m a Vietnam veteran and I remember the congressional investigations of the 1970s later disclosed, and I was in the intelligence community then, that some intelligence programs were carried out for domestic political purposes without proper legal authorization or oversight. But having lived through that, as a part of the intelligence community I can now assure the American people that the intelligence community today is not like that. We operate within a robust framework of strict rules and rigorous oversight involving all three branches of the government.
Anderson Cooper
Host of CNN Anderson Cooper 360
CNNW 01/23/2014
Cooper: We've taken public servants on their word before only to find out they weren't telling the truth or were exaggerating. Listen to this exchange from senator Ron Wyden and director of national intelligence James Clapper. Wyden: What i wanted to see is if you could give me a yes-or-no answer to the question does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans? Clapper: no, sir. Wyden: It does not? Clapper: not wittingly. There are cases where they could Cooper: Again, when the facts finally came to light, we learned that statement by director Clapper was not true. It was false.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Wyden: Declassified court documents show that in 2011 the NSA sought and obtained the authority to go through communications collected with respect to section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence and Surveillance Act and conduct warrantless searches for the communications of specific Americans. Can you tell us today whether any searches have ever been conducted? Clapper: Senator Wyden, I think at a threat hearing, this would – I would prefer not to discuss this and have this as a separate subject because there are very complex legal issues here that I just don't think is the appropriate time to discuss them. Wyden: When would that time be? I tried with written questions, Director Clapper, a year ago
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Wyden: to get answered. We were stonewalled on that in this committee can't do oversight if we can't get direct answers. When will you give the American people and unclassified answer to that question that relates directly to the privacy? Clapper: As soon as we can. Soon, I can Wyden: What would be wrong with 30 days? Clapper: That's fine.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Clapper: I am speaking about the most massive and damaging theft of our intelligence information in our history by Edward Snowden and the ensuing avalanche of revelations published and broadcast around the world. I won’t dwell on the debate about Snowden’s motives or legal standing or on the supreme ironies associated with his choice of freedom loving nations and beacons of free expression from which to rail about what an Orwellian state he thinks this country has become.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Clapper: As a consequence the nation is less safe and it’s people less secure. What Snowden has stolen and exposed has gone way beyond his professed concerns with so- called domestic surveillance programs. As a result we’ve lost critical foreign intelligence collection sources including some shared with us by valued partners. Terrorists and other adversaries of this country are going to school on U.S. intelligence sources, methods and tradecraft and the insights that they are gaining are making our job much much harder. This includes putting the lives of members or assets of the intelligence community at risk as well as our armed forces, diplomats, and our citizens. We are beginning to see changes in the communications behavior of adversaries which you alluded to particularly terrorists, a disturbing trend which I anticipate will continue.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Clapper: Snowden claims that he’s won and that his mission is accomplished. If that is so I call on him and his accomplices facilitate the return of the remaining stolen documents that have not yet been exposed to prevent even more damage to U.S. security.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Clapper: the major take away for us, certainly for me, from the past several months is we must lean in the direction of transparency wherever and whenever we can. With greater transparency about these programs, the American people may be more likely to accept them. The President set the tone and direction for us in his speech as well as in his landmark presidential policy directive. A major hallmark of which is transparency. I have specific tasking In conjunction with the Attorney General to conduct further declassification to develop additional protections under section 702 of the FISA Act to modify how we conduct bulk collection of telephone metadata under section 215 of the Patriot Act and to ensure more oversight of sensitive collection activities. We will need your support in making these changes. Through all of this, we must and will sustain our professional tradecraft and integrity. We must continue to protect our crown jewel sources and methods…
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Mikulski: We need to determine the constitutionality. Would you, cause if it's not constitutional, that’s it. What, General Clapper, would you consulting with the department of justice, the white house, ask for an expedited review by the Supreme Court of the United States to determine the constitutionality of these programs so that we don't continually shop for a legal opinion that we want, either one side or the other. Clapper: I’ll discuss this with the Attorney General. i am not up with the protocol for seeking a reading by the supreme court.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Clapper: With all the controversy, we all felt and still feel what were doing was legal, was oversighted, both by all three branches of the government . There is a current court ruling, a fourth amendment ruling, which of course, if data is provided to a third party. it doesn’t, uh Mikulski: General Clapper, there are 336 different legal opinions. Clapper: I realize that. Mikulski: 36 say the program is constitutional. Judge Leon said it's not. I’m not avoiding them. Clapper: Exactly. Nor are we. Mikulski: I respect the appeals process, but I think we’ve got to get a constitutional ruling on this as quickly as possible. I think the American people are entitled to knowing that and I think the men and women who work at NSA need to know that and I think those of us who want to (?) the review and reform effort need to know that.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Clapper: I could not agree with you more about the need for clarity on these issues for the women and men of the intelligence community who are trying to do the right thing.
Richard Burr
Senator (R-North Carolina) Member of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Burr: General Clapper, over the last several years, the committee has had some difficulty receiving timely briefings after significant events or terrorist attacks, despite the commitment we had from you that those briefings would happen within 24 hours. Moving forward, will you renew your commitment to the committee to brief us on those events in a timely fashion? Clapper: yes, Sir, we always strive to do that.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Clapper: I think it’s an important tool (Section 215). And I also think, and I’ve said this before, that simply using the metric of plots foiled is not necessarily a way to get at the value of the program. What it does is it allows us to eliminate the possibility of a terrorist nexus in a domestic context. So for example, last summer, when I think 20 or so, were diplomatic facilities in the middle east were closed because various threat conditions. And in the course of that we came across nine selectors that pointed to the United States. So the use of this tool, of the 215 tool enabled us to quickly eliminate the possibility of a domestic nexus.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 01/29/2014
Wyden: This is a request for the record. General Clapper, this is apropos of the good point Senator King meant. He asked you and General Comey whether bulk collection of all these phone records on law-abiding Americans, is necessary to prevent terror. And you all said that it was because of timeliness. As you know, the independent review commission, page 104 in their report, said that was not the case. They could get the data in a timely way without collecting all of these millions of phone records on law-abiding Americans. So if you all would, for the record, and I’ve asked this as well before, give us an example of a time when you have needed a record that was so old that the relevant phone company no longer had it. And I want to say, Mr. Director, that I think that’s possible within 30 days to have an answer to that since I’ve asked that repeatedly. If there’s some reason that you can’t do it, please let me know. Clapper: Yes, sir.
James Clapper (quoted)
Director of National Intelligence
CNNW 02/18/2014
Baldwin: Now back to James Clapper, Director of National Intelligence, made these candid remarks about the phone data collection by the government. This is what he said in this interview here. Let me quote him. He said, Clapper (quoted): "Had we been transparent about this from the outset right after 9/11, we wouldn't have had the problem we had with the explosive public reaction." Baldwin: It is worth pointing out, phone data collection proceeds the Obama administration, so Clapper wasn't there to make those early decisions. Do you think he's shoving blame for the heat he’s taken on to the Bush Administration here? Tapper: Well obviously there's some of that, because he's talking about this needing to have been done ten years ago. But I think more theoretically, and obviously, President Obama could have come in and Clapper, when he was appointed Director of National Intelligence, could have come in and announced (that this program section 215, the collection of metadata, the surveillance on Americans, they could have announced it at the time.)
James Clapper (quoted)
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 02/18/2014
Henry: on national security. James Clapper, you probably saw comments he made to "The Daily Beast" where he at one point said he said quote Clapper (quoted): “I probably shouldn't say this but I will. Had we been transparent about this from the outset right after 9/11,” Henry: which is the genesis of the 215 program, he’s talking about the metadata and said both to the American people and their elected representatives, we need to cover this gap. He said if we have been more transparent "we wouldn't have these problems." That Edward Snowden's leak's wouldn’t have had as much of an impact on the American people if the intelligence community had been more transparent. Does the President agree with that assessment? Carney: Well, I certainly don't think that Director Clapper is saying anything that should come as a surprise. I mean he’s going all the way back to the event that led to the creation of some of these programs. Henry: He’s talking about both administrations I should point out.
Amy Goodman
Host and Executive Producer for Democracy Now
LINKTV 04/22/2014
Goodman: The Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper has issued a sweeping order barring agencies under his watch from almost all unauthorized contact with the media. The ban applies to discussion of all intelligence related matters, whether they are classified or not. Violators face a minimum security violation and potential prosecution. Clapper's directive comes just months after he told the senate he would seek to "lean in the direction of transparency, wherever and whenever we can."
Glenn Greenwald
Guardian Reporter
KQED 05/20/2014
Narrator: The document directly contradicted what Director of National Intelligence General James Clapper had said before Congress just a few months earlier. Wyden: Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans? Clapper No, sir. Wyden: It does not? Clapper: Not wittingly. There are cases where they could inadvertently, perhaps, collect, but not wittingly. Greenwald: I think for Snowden, the Clapper testimony was the final nail in the coffin. Watching President Obama's top national security official go before the Senate Intelligence Committee and outright lie about what the NSA was doing convinced him, I think, beyond any shadow of a doubt, that the only hope for public discussion and reform was for him to do what he was going to do.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
MSNBCW 08/06/2014
Kornacki: Talk about what is potentially being left out of this report, as it's currently been redacted by the CIA. Because you have James Clapper, the Director of National Intelligence, who said even with these redactions, he estimated that 85% of that report that your committee put together still is in place, and he says it would still offer, quote, “a full view of the committee's report on the detention and interrogation program.” that the heart of that report is not lost in this. What do you say to that?
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